Lets look at: Bandai Apple @Work Pippin: Apple’s gaming folly Part 2

Bandai Apple Pippin Part 2

Apple’s relationship with games has always been a little confused, but during the PowerMac era when they were trying to gain market share in any way possible gaming was seen as a possibility.

Enter the Apple Pippin architecture, a hardware reference based on the Quadra PowerMac line and featuring an entry level 603 processor.  Apple hoped to sell this to manufactures as a way of gaining access to the living room.

In the end only two manufacturers joined the program, Bandai who concentrated on Japan and North America and Katz Media who released the European version.

In the end the high cost and relative lack of performance to the rest of the Fifth Generation  consoles killed the project.  Japan and North America saw less than 100,000 sales combined and Europe only ever saw a very limited release before being cancelled.

Continue reading “Lets look at: Bandai Apple @Work Pippin: Apple’s gaming folly Part 2”

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Lets look at: Bandai Apple @Work Pippin: Apple’s gaming folly

Bandai Apple Pippin

Apple’s relationship with games has always been a little confused, but during the PowerMac era when they were trying to gain market share in any way possible gaming was seen as a possibility.

Enter the Apple Pippin architecture, a hardware reference based on the Quadra PowerMac line and featuring an entry level 603 processor.  Apple hoped to sell this to manufactures as a way of gaining access to the living room.

In the end only two manufacturers joined the program, Bandai who concentrated on Japan and North America and Katz Media who released the European version.

In the end the high cost and relative lack of performance to the rest of the Fifth Generation  consoles killed the project.  Japan and North America saw less than 100,000 sales combined and Europe only ever saw a very limited release before being cancelled.

Continue reading “Lets look at: Bandai Apple @Work Pippin: Apple’s gaming folly”

Bandai Pippin

Bandai Pippin

5th Generation Competitors
3DO Jaguar Saturn Playstation Nintendo 64 FM Towns Marty PC-FX CD32 Playdia Loopy
Region Release Date Discontinued Lifetime Sales
Japan 28th Mar 1996 1997 42K (total)
North America 1st Sep 1996 1997
Europe 1997 1997

In 1996 the post-jobs world of Apple was searching around for ways to spread their PowerPC platform.  Seeing how consoles had integrated into so many living rooms they decided that this was the direction to go.  So, working with Bandai, they developed the Pippin Platform.  This platform was based on their existing Power Mac computers.

The Pippin was a hugely powerful machine and included numerous options that no other console had.  These included the ability to be used in PAL or NTSC out of the box and they had a built-in VGA port as well as the usual composite jacks.

Bandai released the Pippin in Japan as the ATMARK and in the US as ATWORLD.  These machines were largely identical except the US one was black from the start and the Japanese release was white.

In Europe Katz Media released a slightly improved machine with more memory.

The Pippin was incredibly expensive at release, unsurprising seeing as it had such a powerful spec.  But despite that it couldn’t compete well with the Playstation or Saturn.  Nobody wanted to buy a machine that was weaker and more expensive.  The Japanese version is easiest to get hold of, the US version is rare and the European version is nearly impossible to get.

The Pippin came with internet access built-in, via a phone jack.  The controller, called the Apple Jack, had a built-in trackball to help you navigate web pages.

The community has since released a version of Mac OS 7 that can be booted, pretty much making the Pippin into a working Macintosh.

Continue reading “Bandai Pippin”